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  #1  
Old 05-01-2007, 07:26 PM
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Default buiyng a polarizer

so I reached the moment to buy a polarizer. this summer want to visit Portugal and could be usefull to have dramatic blue sky and well contrasted pictures..
I'm using UV filter just for lens protection and want to buy good quality polarizer. think about Hoya:
Hoya 72mm SHMC Pro-1D WB PL-Circ, for about 130 pounds in www.parkcameras.com or Hoya 72mm SHMC Pro 1 Circular Polarizing (111 pounds). what about cheaper Hoya 72mm Circular Polarizing (58 pounds), does anybody could tell me, whether to invest in the expensive one or stay with normal circullar polarizer? the prices are from the shop and ebay offers it for much less.
and the second question: when buing expensive best quality PL filter, do you always have it on your lens? or just turn it on only on special occasions?
how are your polarizer filter experiances? cheers for help.
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  #2  
Old 05-01-2007, 10:42 PM
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Default Re: buiyng a polarizer

I have a Cokin polarising filter that I use in the "P" series holder and I also have a Marumi 77mm circular polariser that I tend to use solely on my 17-55mm f2.8

The Cokin is fine but the Marumi is excellent. The fact that it has a very low profile rim means that there's never the slightest hint of vignetting - even on the odd occasion I use it on the 11-18mm lens.

I tend to regard it as a special effects filter and, unless there's a need for it, I tend to just use a clear digital protect filter. Having said that, my chosen style is (for the most part) to render the image as close to the way it looked when I was there as possible.

Incidentally, the Marumi circular polariser came out on top of a poll in one of the camera mags recently - so, despite them not being a big name, they seem to be gaining a good reputation.

Paul.
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  #3  
Old 05-02-2007, 03:36 AM
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Default Re: buiyng a polarizer

Hi Tomasz,

I have the Hoya 72mm SHMC Pro-1 CP. I have seen shots will all three the hoya filters and tried the standard CP as well. The difference between the Pro-1 and the Pro-1D cannot be seen by me. The difference between the Pro1 and the standard 72mm CP is very clear in pictures!
One can think about a bigger chance on vignetting and kind of a 'smudging' in the colour, ie. the sky is clearly unicolor blue, the polarized sky should be uniform as well then, but just isn't entirely.

I would go for the Pro 1 and buy it through internet. I'm lucky enough to live in Asia at the moment and bought it here for 55 USD. But 111 pounds is too expensive.

A PL filter is something you put on for some shots. It's not always on. I thought that in the beginning as well "you turn it around for more effect, so if it's turned up, no effect, if turned 90 degrees, full effect". Nope. The PL lense is having two rims of which you turn one, but the effect goes from little to full effect. In that sense, you need to take it off if you don't want the effect.
This sunset picture is taken with full polarizing effect with the Pro-1. I think I use a PL filter on 3-5% of my pictures. Mainly skylines, landscapes where I want a lot of contrast.

Oh, if your lense TURNS when focussing, you cannot use a PL filter!!!! (Since you already turn the PL filter, so your lense should be steady).

Greetings! Dennis
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  #4  
Old 05-02-2007, 12:48 PM
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Default Marumi 77 mm.

I have 77 mm Marumi polarizer. It creates really bad vignetting on Canon 20D with EF-S 10-22 while zoomed to 10 mm. Would not recommend such combination of camera, lens and filter.

Linas
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  #5  
Old 05-02-2007, 04:37 PM
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Emiel_Skyfreak Emiel_Skyfreak is offline
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Default Re: buying a polarizer

Ofcourse you can use a (C)PL on a lens which turns when you're focussing. It's not nice, since you got to turn the polarizer around again too, every time..it can be a pain in the ass maybe, but you can use it! Ofcourse it's very useful if your lens focusses internally, saves time, blood, tears ;)

I've a Hoya Pro1 (or Pro1D, gotta look when I'm at home) 77mm circulair polarizing (CPL) filter, aswell as a more standard Hoya CPL 72mm.
I've bought the 77mm later, since I bought a lens, Sigma's 10-20 which needed a 77mm filter, an adapterring to make a 72mm filter fit on it wouldn't work, since it's an extremely wide angle lens, it would result in lot's of vignette.
Bought the 72mm in a camerastore, the 77mm via eBay from the States, which is lot's cheaper! You can also try buying it from Hong Kong, where I've also bought a UV-filter from (again eBay)

Buy a GOOD filter, Hoya SHMC/Pro1(D) or B+W MRC, or one of the expensive Cokin's (NOT the cheapass one's!), a bad filter harms your image quality, and might spoil the quality of your (expensive?) lenses. Don't put a cheap filter on a expensive lens, then leave the filter away. On the other way around, also do not put a 120 pound filter on a kitlens.
A cheap filter saves you money, but hey..it's a waste if you don't use it!

An idea can be to go for a 77mm filter in once and use adapter rings if you need a filter with a size 72mm or 67mm now.
Buying a 72mm CPL, and a (half?) year later having to buy a 77mm CPL, when you've bought a new lens (which might use 77mm filters), like I did, is a waste of money. Bigger filters are quite easy to use on smaller lenses, if the difference in size is not to big. The other way around is harder, smaller filter on larger lens, especially wide angles.

Sure a 77mm filter is more expensive than a 72mm one, but you'll save money if you need one later. 77mm is a large, but common size, bigger is far less common.

The filter does have an effect (ofcourse) so you might not want it attached on the lens in every occasion, it might not suit every (or far from every) photo you take. Others explained this allready.

Some guy at another forum I'm on always comes with this store :
http://shop.vendio.com/hkd which seems to be http://hvstar.net/ since a few days.
I've never bought there, but they have a great assortiment of good filters for good prices (you can easily save 20 dollars or more there)! I'll certainly have a look there next time when I 'need' to buy a filter.
Maybe soon again (need two 58mm filters, for someone else=a present and one for my own telelens)
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  #6  
Old 05-02-2007, 04:49 PM
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Default Re: buying a polarizer

The shop I've mentioned by the way also has the adapterrings, under filter accesoires, 3 dollars (72-77) (lens-filter)

+ Hoya 77mm PRO1 DIGITAL Circular Polarizer Filter DMC *=low profile

In Stock hvStar Price
Yes $60.90
+ 2,90 = $63,80 for a A+ class 77mm filter + adapterring.

+ some shipping costs maybe, that's in any way far less than 100+ pounds!

Good luck.
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  #7  
Old 05-08-2007, 01:16 AM
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Default Re: buiyng a polarizer

thank you guys for help -- I'm gonna go for Pro1 and buy it from Ebay, will be much cheaper and according to your notes, there is no way to save on filters.
I though, that I'd able to use it more then by 5% pictures, but will see how it works live. cheers for answering my questions.
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  #8  
Old 05-08-2007, 02:12 AM
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AdrianW AdrianW is offline
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Default Re: buiyng a polarizer

If you want to buy the standard one, then the cheapest place in the UK is almost invariably 7d ayshop - ditto film and memory cards.

They've been reliable (if slow) for me.

Whether you need the more expensive filter really depends on what lens you're using it on - the Pro-1 is thinner, which is useful for really wide-angle lenses, but if you're using it on an ultra-wide, be careful as the effect can be a bit weird as there's so much in frame.

Also think about the largest filter size you're going to need - buy that, then use stepping rings for the smaller lenses, as they're lighter and cheaper than extra filters!
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  #9  
Old 05-08-2007, 12:57 PM
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Default Re: buiyng a polarizer

Though it's possible, you need a lot of stepping rings to fit a 77mm filter onto a 58mm telekitlens (or even 55 or 52mm), so in that case two filters might be a good idea. But indeed, if one lens is 67mm and the other 72mm/77mm, buy a 77mm and use stepping rings. Then you only have to buy a good and large filter once. Unless your unlucky to require a 82mm filter for a next lens, but quite few lenses require that size. 77mm is the largest common size.
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  #10  
Old 05-09-2007, 04:25 AM
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Default Re: buiyng a polarizer

You simply buy a 58mm >72mm step up list here. Each ring costs you 4.5GBP, they're light, and easy to use.

Good large polarizers cost over 100GBP each for example here.

I have lenses that use 58mm 72mm and 77mm - so I use a 77mm filter, and two stepping rings (one 58>77 the other 72>77)
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